Scientific Dive Program

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 The Division of Scientific Diving provides a large pool of trained staff and volunteer Scientific Divers that provide the backbone of man-power for many underwater studies at the Center for Conservation. Divers at The Florida Aquarium have been involved in the research studying community patterns following red tide events, coral reef restoration, and invasive animal removal and are currently engaged in gathering historic aquatic information including Florida's unique prehistoric and historic legacy of human settlement, which before now have not been included in the underwater archaeological record. 

 

The Florida Aquarium has more than 100 trained staff and volunteer scientific divers in the Scientific Dive Program. Each Scientific Diver must complete a minimum 100 hour training course to meet the standards of the American Academy of Underwater Sciences. The Scientific Dive training program is field-oriented, dynamic, and extensive; training often occurs at field sites where active research projects are underway. This training is critical to the production of high quality underwater studies & scientific information that informs our scientists on habitat quality, best habitat management practices, and Florida's unique history.  

 

 

What Lies Beneath...

 

image descriptionFlorida's Pre-History

Little Salt Spring is one of the most important archaeological sites in the state, and perhaps the nation, for its wealth of information about the first Floridians more than 12,000 years ago. Find out what artifacts are bring brought up from 90 feet below the surface of the spring.

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Saving Coral Reefs

Coral reefs are the richest and most complex ecosystems of all marine environments. Today, reefs are threatened by dredging, ship grounding, pollution, illegal collecting, harsh weather events, disease and global warming. Our conservation team is restoring coral reefs to the wild to promote new growth.

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Civil War Shipwrecks

The Florida Aquarium is charting new territory. Literally. With a grant from the state, Aquarium researchers are taking a look at what is on the bottom of the bay. What lies beneath? That is exactly what Billy Ray Morris, primary investigator and marine archaeologist, wants to know.